Homily For 3rd (“Gaudate”) Sunday Of Advent, Year B

Rejoice, Rejoice All You Who Are Faithful!

Readings: (1st: Is 61, 1-2.10-11: Ps: Lk 1, 46-54; 2nd: 2 Th 5, 16-22: Gos: Jh 1, 6-8. 19-28)

This brief reflection was written by Rev. Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a Member of the Congregation of the Holy Ghost Fathers and Brothers (Spiritans). He is currently working with the Spiritan International Group of Puerto Rico &  Dominican Republic. He is the Administrator of Parroquia La Resurrección del Senor, Canovanas and the Chancellor of the Diocesis of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico. For more details and comments contact him on:  canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

The third Sunday of Advent is a Sunday of joy (Gaudete). Having come thus far in our journey, the Church says to us as the prophet Nehemiah said to the Israelites: “Go and enjoy…Do not grieve, for the joy of the LORD is your strength” (Neh 8, 10). However, after today, we must continue our journey with a new zeal and expectation.

In our first reading today, Isaiah busts out in Joy as he experienced the divine presence and hand of God tremendously at work in his life and mission: “The Spirit of the Lord has been given to me, for the Lord has anointed me to…” This is a song of joy and satisfaction of an empowered person. He recounts what God has done in his life.

This too should be our song today because, we have been filled with the Spirit of God. We are filled in order to be strengthened for the last phase of our journey this Advent. So, in appreciation for this, we shout for joy to the Lord. This is the great joy that Gaudate Sunday provokes. That is, the joy that our Saviour is near.

Our second reading is an explicit exaltation from Paul to us especially on this great and joy-filled Sunday of Advent: “Be happy at all times, pray constantly, and for all things give thanks to God…” In this brief exaltation, we find a wonderful progression. First, it is an exaltation to be happy, joyful and cheerful because our journey so far has been so good.

Second, it is an exaltation to “Pray constantly,” to be vigilant. Therefore, for Gaudate Sunday to be truly meaningful, it must provoke a great feeling of joy and thankfulness, while still strongly preserving, and keeping us focused on our journey and duty this glorious season of Advent. It is not the end our journey.

Once again, today our gospel revolves round the prophecy and clarion call of the “Prophet of Prophets,” John the BaptistThe major difference between today’s gospel and that of last week rests simply on the fact that they are accounts from different writers Mark and John. The message remains functionally and ontologically the same. It is still from: “The voice that cries in the wilderness, make a straight way for the Lord.” 

Why is this reading and call being repeated this joyful Sunday? It is for the purpose of emphasis. It is to remind us that, though we are given a little time to relax and rejoice today, that the clarion call is still there: “Make a straight way for the Lord.” In order words, our preparation continues. So, it is a way of keeping us alert so that we do not lose focus of where we are actually going to: “It is NOT Christmas yet!” The joy of this Sunday foreshadows the fullness of joy that Christmas brings.

Finally, brethren, as we rejoice today, let us say a loud amen to the prayer of Paul: “May the God of Peace make you perfect and holy, and may you all be kept safe and blameless…for the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ…God has called you and he will not fail you.” Surely, He will not fail us until we have received Christ, the fullness of our joy and salvation.  Surely, he will not fail us because: “All His promises are yes, and amen (2 Cor 1, 20).

Peace be with You!

Maranatha!!

 

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Homily For 2nd Sunday Of Advent, Year B

Why Is Jesus Christ Coming?
Readings: (1st: Is 40, 1-5.9-11: Ps 84, 9-14; 2nd: 2 Pt 3, 8-14; Gos: Mk 1, 1-8)

This brief reflection was written by Rev. Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a Member of the Congregation of the Holy Ghost Fathers and Brothers (Spiritans). He is currently working with the Spiritan International Group of Puerto Rico &  Dominican Republic. He is the Administrator of Parroquia La Resurrección del Senor, Canovanas and the Chancellor of the Diocesis of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico. For more details and comments contact him on:  canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

On this second week of Advent, we continue to prepare for the Lord’s coming. Today, the church calls us to reflect on the good news of this season. Thus, we are to reflect on the reason of Christ’s coming, and on what we are expected to do this season.
Today, our readings focus on the nearness of the Lord’s coming and the need for repentance for the forgiveness of sins. So, one very important question today is, why is Christ coming? He is coming because he loves us. He is coming to save us. He is coming to make all things new. He has a mission, and that mission is for us, and for our salvation.
In our first reading, Isaiah implores us to: “prepare a way for the Lord… Here is the Lord, coming with power…” Today he sounds very optimistic. Last week, he made a petition, asking God to “tear down the heaven and come down.” His prayer of hope is already bearing fruits soon. So, God says this week, “console my people, console them…”
Like Isaiah, we too must progress in our journey this Advent. Isaiah’s prophecy today is a great hope booster. That is, that our salvation is close at hand. So, let us continue to wait for the Lord’s coming. However, it is not yet over. The fulfillment of this hope still lies ahead. So, rather than relax, we must heed his call, “prepare a way for the Lord…”
In the second reading, Peter assures us that Christ will certainly come. Once again, like the Prophet Isaiah, he gives a boost to our hope. He encourages us not to lose hope in the prophetic promises of the coming of the Messiah. Today, Peter makes the following very important points. The first is about the “The Day of the Lord.” He reminds us that it will come like a thief. Therefore, this is a season to be alert and vigilant.
Second, Peter reminds us that our “long time” is nothing, compared to God’s time. Hence, there is a difference between God’s time and ours. Our human time is “Chronos.” That is, the sequential time. While God’s reckoning of time is “Kairos” That is, a special moment that seems almost timeless or ageless. Hence, we say: “God’s time is the best time!”
In today’s gospel, like Isaiah, John the Baptist brings us the good news about the Lord’s imminent coming. He makes two explicit calls to us. The first is, a call to repent for the forgiveness of our sins. Advent is the time to reconcile with God whom we have severally offended through our words and actions.
Repentance and reconciliation are very important conditions for us to welcome Christ worthily. This is what the prophets (Isaiah and John the Baptist), and the Apostle Peter mean by, “preparing a way for the Lord” and “living holy and saintly lives.” If we repent sincerely this season, then the salvation that Jesus brings will be ours. If we clean up ourselves properly, we need not be afraid of the Day of the Lord.
Finally, anticipation of the Lord’s coming should not merely determine our manner of lives. Rather, it should motivate us to repentance, holiness of life, godliness, and of course, joyfulness. Therefore, as we continue to wait and prepare, let us humbly pray with the psalmist: “O Lord, let us see your mercy, and give us your saving help.”
Peace be with You!
Maranatha!

 

Homily For 1st Sunday Of Advent, Year B

Advent: Season Of Great Expectation And Joyful Hope
Readings: (1st: Ish 63, 16-17. 64, 1-8: Ps 79, 2-119; 2nd: I Cor 1, 3-9; Gos: Mtt 13, 33-37)

This brief reflection was written by Rev. Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a Member of the Congregation of the Holy Ghost Fathers and Brothers (Spiritans). He is currently working with the Spiritan International Group of Puerto Rico &  Dominican Republic. He is the Administrator of Parroquia La Resurrección del Senor, Canovanas and the Chancellor of the Diocesis of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico. For more details and comments contact him on:  canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

Today is the first Sunday of Advent and of a new liturgical calendar, year B. Remarkably, as we begin a new liturgical year today, we move from the gospel according to Matthew’s to the gospel according to Mark, the shortest of the four canonical Gospels.
Advent is a season of hope and a period during which as Christians we await the fulfillment of the promise of God through his prophets. In addition to being a season of hope, it is equally, a season of patience and prayer. During these four weeks, what are we expected to do? We are expected to prepare for the birth of the messiah. It suffices to note that while we prepare physically, the most important must be the spiritual preparation.
Our first reading from Isaiah is both a prophetic message, as well as a prayer of hope. Isaiah begins by acknowledging the greatness of God: “O Lord you are our Father, Our Redeemer is your ancient name…” Then, he makes a petition to God: “Why leave us to stray from your ways…Oh that you would tear the heavens open and come down…?”
This is a prayer of hope. As Isaiah rightly demanded, God will not keep silent until we are saved. That salvation is what our hope in Christ will accomplish for us. Therefore, when Isaiah asks God to tear the heavens and come down, he expects God to come quickly.
This is Our Lord’s prayer, “…Your kingdom come on earth as it is in heaven.” It is also Paul’s petition, “Maranatha!” It is the cry of the Spirit and the Bride: “Come, Lord Jesus” (CCC 2817). God’s power and salvation is what we hope to see at the end of this season. That is, when God’s word would become flesh and born of a virgin.
In our second reading, Paul encourages us to be faithful as we wait for the coming of Christ. Though, Paul was referring to the parousia, yet, this reading is very ad rem to this season of Advent. Paul reminds us that we have received the gifts of the Spirit. It is these gifts of the Spirit that will strengthen us as we wait in joyful hope for Christ.
Our life is a long vigil, waiting for the Lord to be revealed in all his glory. So, we wait with expectation and joyful hope because His is Spirit is with us. If we walk with him this season, God will not fail us because: “our expectation shall not be cut short” (Pr 23, 18). So, as the Spirit guides us, we must prepare prayerfully, through the help of the Sacraments. This is especially, through the sacrament of reconciliation.
The gospel of today is a clarion call to be awake and alert. Only the Spirit of God can help us do this faithfully. Therefore, rather than obey the spirit of this world this season, we must obey the Spirit of God, who sustains us. So, let us to have our minds fixed on him.
It suffices to note that if we light up our houses and streets, without lightening up our lives spiritually for Christ to walk into it; if we prepare all things and places without preparing a manger for baby Jesus in our lives then, our preparation would not be complete.
Finally, as we eagerly anticipate the coming of the Lord this season, our hope and expectation should prompt us to be always awake and vigilant. It should make us prepare adequately in order to avail ourselves of Jesus’ mercy. Therefore, our constant prayer during this season as Paul constantly prayed should be: “Maranatha! Come Lord Jesus!”
Peace be with you all!
Maranatha!!

 

Homilia De La Solemnidad De Cristo Rey Del Universo, Año A

Deje Que Cristo Rey Del Universo Reina En Su Vida

Lecturas: (1ra: Ez 34, 11-17; Sal 22, 1-6; 2da: I Co 15, 20-28; Ev: Mt 25, 31-46)

Esta breve reflexión fue escrita por el Reverendo Padre Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. Él es un sacerdote católico y un miembro de la Congregación de los Padres y Hermanos del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos). Él está trabajando con el Grupo Internacional Espirítano De Puerto Rico y República Dominicana. Él es el administrador de la Parroquia La Resurrección del Señor, Canóvanas y el Canciller de la Diócesis de Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico. Para más detalles y comentarios se puede contactarlo encanice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, cancilleriadfh@gmail.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com

El trigésimo cuatro domingo de tiempo ordinario marca el termino de cada ano litúrgico. Mas importante, es la solemnidad de Cristo Rey del Universo. Esta Fiesta fue establecida por el papa Pio XI en 1929 contra una influencia peligrosa de secularismo. La fiesta es por el motivo a proclamar en una manera efectiva la realeza de Cristo sobre toda nación.

En la primera lectura de hoy el señor por el profeta Exequiel nos aseguró de su cuida continua para nosotros: Yo mismo iré a buscar a mis ovejas…Yo mismo apacentare mis ovejas, y las hare reposar…” una cosa bien importante sobre esta lectura es que, por muchas veces, el pronombre personal “Yo” fue empleado. Primero, esto es para convenir el interés personal de Dios para su rebano. En segundo lugar, es para demonstrar su promesa que ya está cumplida en Jesucristo en nuestro tiempo.

También, en esta lectura, Dios presento el “manifiesto” de su reinado que será encabezado por Cristo. El manifiesto de Dios es diferente de políticos de este mundo. Siempre nos prometen: educación, casa, plan médico, transportación, más trabajo, y mucho más gratis. Nunca cumplirán sus promesas antes del término de su tenor en la oficina y se van.

Al contrario, el manifiesto de Dios es absolutamente diferente porque es real y verdadero, No es caridad con un gancho. Esto es porque, Dios es un rey fiel: “Dios no es un hombre para que mienta, ni es un hijo del hombre para que volver atrás (Nu 23, 19). ¡Nunca!

En la segunda lectura, Pablo nos recuerda del reinado de Cristo. Se continuará a mantener su reinado hasta que vence la muerte, nuestro ultimo enemigo. Cristo cumplió una tarea que nadie podría cumplir. Es decir, el venció pecador y satanás por su propia muerte. Fue un cien por ciento derrota.

Lo hizo por: “Anulando el comprobante de nuestra deuda, esos preceptos que nos acusaban; lo clavó en la cruz y lo suprimió” (Col 2, 14). Lo hizo por nosotros y por su reino. Así que, debemos permanecer con aquel que derramó su sangre pro nosotros. Debemos ser parte de su reinado. Lo debemos homenaje todo día de nuestra vida, porque es el Rey de los reyes y Señor de los señores.

El evangelio de hoy también, nos recuerda del reinado de Cristo. Su reinado es de la justicia. Juzgará cada persona según sus obras. No habrá corrupción, fraude, manipulación o injusticia estructural durante su reinado. Al contrario: “Hará arbitro entre la nación y los pueblos dará lecciones. Harán arados de sus espadas y sacarán hoces de sus lanzas. Una nación no levantará la espada contra otra” (Is 2, 4) y su reinado será de paz y justicia.

¿Dónde se supone reinar a Cristo? ¡Por supuesto en nuestros corazones! Así que, es importante notar que nuestra celebración hoy significaría algo bien, solamente si nos permitamos a Cristo a reinar en nuestras vidas. Si él reina en todo corazón, pues se reina en nuestro mundo. Si ya reina allí, goza y celebra. Si no, vamos a pedirle hoy que venga a reinar en nuestros corazones. Cristo nos dice: “Mira que estoy a la puerta y llamo: si uno escucha mi voz y me abre, entrare en su casa y comeré con él y el conmigo” (Ap 3, 20).

En conclusión, como celebramos Cristo Rey del universo hoy, debamos permitir que él estar varadamente en control del reino de nuestros corazones porque siendo un buen pastor, si lo hacemos el rey de nuestras vidas, no faltáramos nada. Su bondad y misericordia nos acompañarán todo lo día de nuestra vida. Y por supuesto, viviremos pacíficamente en su palacio.

¡La paz sea con ustedes!

¡Maranatha!

Homily For Solemnity Of Christ The King (34th Year, A)

Let Christ The King Of The Universe Reign In Your Life

Readings: (1st: Ezek 34, 11-17; Ps. 22, 1-6; 2nd: I Cor 15, 20-28; Gos: Mt 25, 31-46)

This brief reflection was written by Rev. Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a Member of the Congregation of the Holy Ghost Fathers and Brothers (Spiritans). He is currently working with the Spiritan International Group of Puerto Rico &  Dominican Republic. He is the Administrator of Parroquia La Resurrección del Senor, Canovanas and the Chancellor of the Diocesis of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico. For more details and comments contact him on:  canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

 The thirty fourth Sunday of ordinary time marks the end of every liturgical year. Most importantly, it is the solemnity of Christ the King. The Feast of Christ the King was established by Pope Pius XI in 1925 against the deadly influence of Secularism. The feast is intended to proclaim in a resounding and effective way, Christ’s royalty over all nations.

In the first reading of today, the Lord through prophet Ezekiel reassures us of his continuous care for us: “I am going to look after my flock myself… I shall be a true shepherd to them…” One remarkable thing about this reading is that for nine times, the personal pronoun “I” was employed. First, this is to convey God’s personal interest in his flock. Second, this was to prove his promises already fulfilled in Jesus Christ in our time.

In this reading also, God presented “the manifesto” of his reign to be headed by Christ. God’s own manifesto is different from those presented to us by politicians of our days: “free education, housing, medical care, transportation, low taxation, more jobs, high income rates etc.” They never fulfill their promises before the end of their tenure in office.

In contrast, the manifesto of God is absolutely different, because it is real and true. It is not charity with a hook. This is because, God is a faithful King: “God is not human, that he should lie. Does he speak, and then not act? Does he promise and not fulfill? (Nu 23, 19). Never!

In the second reading, Paul reminds us of Christ’s kingship and reign. He will continue to maintain his reign until He conquers death, our last enemy. Christ accomplished a task that no other could. That is, the defeat of sin and Satan through his own death. It was a hundred percent and total knockout.

He did it: “By canceling the record of debt that stood against us with its legal demands…nailing it to the cross and by triumphing over them…” (Col 2, 14). He did it for our sake, and for the sake of his kingdom. So, we must abide with him who shed his blood for us. We must be part of his kingdom. We owe him homage every day of our life because, He is the King of kings.

Today’s gospel reminds us of the reign of Christ. His reign, is that of justice. He will judge each according to his deeds. There will be no corruption, embezzlement, manipulation, or structural injustices during his reign. Rather, “…He will judge among the nations; and they will reshape their swords as plowshares and their spears as pruning hooks. No nation will threaten another, nor will they train for war anymore, and His scepter shall be peace and justice” (Is 2, 4).

Where is Christ supposed to reign? Of course, first, in our hearts! So, it suffices to note that, today’s celebration would be meaningful, only if we personally permit Christ to reign in our lives. If he reigns in every heart, then he reigns in our world. If he reigns there already, then rejoice and celebrate.  If not, then let us ask him today, to come in and reign. He says to us: “I stand at the door waiting, if you open I will come in to eat and dine with him” (Rev 3, 20). 

In conclusion, as we celebrate Christ the King of the universe today, let us permit him to be truly in control of the kingdom of our heart because as the “Bonus pastor,” If we make Him the king of our lives, we shall lack nothing, and surely, his goodness and mercy shall follow us, all the days of our life. And of course, we shall dwell peacefully in His palace.

Peace be with you!

Maranatha!

Homily For 33rd Sunday Of Ordinary Time Year A

Faithfulness To Christ Our Head

Faithfulness To Christ Our Head

Readings: 1st: Prov 31, 10-13.19-20; Ps 127, 1-5; 2nd: 1Thess 5, 1-6; Gos: Matt 25, 14-30

This brief reflection was written by Rev. Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a Member of the Congregation of the Holy Ghost Fathers and Brothers (Spiritans). He is currently working with the Spiritan International Group of Puerto Rico &  Dominican Republic. He is the Administrator of Parroquia La Resurrección del Senor, Canovanas and the Chancellor of the Diocesis of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico. For more details and comments contact him on canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

As we come closer to the end of this liturgical year A, the church encourages us to remain faithful and dedicated to Christ our head. As good servants, we must be devoted to Him. Also, we must be ready to render full account of  our talents to Him.

Our first reading for this Sunday is from proverbs. The virtuous woman of Proverbs radiates as a bright star. The term “virtuous” simply refers to strength, efficiency, or ability. Here, it refers to both spiritual and moral strength, as well as to the firmness of character (Ruth 3:11). So, she is virtous beause of the strenght of her character and devotion.

The virtuous woman is good, faithful, and knows what to do to keep her family together. In addition, “she holds out her hand to the needy.” Today, the virtuous woman is the symbol of the Holy Mother Church, who prepares us adequately to meet Christ our Head. She prepares us through her constant teachings and charitable works. Hence, this is call for us to emulate the qualities of the virtuous woman. We are to be as faithful and devoted as she is to our callings and to God’s mission.

In the second reading, Paul presents to us a description of the conduct expected from a child of the light. He reminds us of the inevitable – The Lord’s Day. According to him, one of the most significant characteristics of this “Day” is that it would be sudden: “It is when people are saying, ‘how quiet and peaceful it is that the worst suddenly happens…” 

In order words, Paul is simply encouraging us to be vigilant and active in our preparation for this day of the Lord. “Gregoreuo” is a Greek word that Paul employed to express the idea of a sleeping man that is always mentally alert. This state of mind is opposite to that of a person who is dead or unconsciously asleep. It is the position we ought to adopt as Christians while waiting for Christ.

Paul’s call, is a call to readiness and to live with eternity’s values in mind. If we do, we will certainly enjoy a better life than those who compromise with the world. We are therefore to live like soldiers in active service (2 Ti 2. 4), and like the virtuous woman working to please her husband and children.

In the gospel, Jesus uses the parable of the talent to equally remind us that we must be ready to render a good account of our tatlents. God has endowed each one of us with different talents. Each, according to our various capacities. So, as faithful servants, he expects to render a good account of the “talents” we have received.

Jesus challenges us to be prudent and productive with our talents. Most importantly, he admonishes us to live in anticipation of His inevitable return. We  must not wait for this  return in idleness. Rather, we must be active and industrious with the talents we have received. So, we must use our talents to the glory of God.

As trustworthy servants, we should avoid indifference, apathy, licentiousness, sloth, complacency towards our mission. These will not fetch us any reward from Christ. If we are faithful and productive with the talents we have received, Christ our head will also say to us: “Well done, good and faithful servant.”

Peace be with you all!

Maranatha!

Homilia Del Trigésimo Segundo Domingo Del Tiempo Ordinario, Año A

Buscan Y Esperan Al Señor Sabiamente

Lecturas: 1ra: Sb 6, 12-16; Sal: 62, 2-8; 2da: 1 Tes 1, 13-18; Ev: Mt 25, 1-13

Esta breve reflexión fue escrita por el Reverendo Padre Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. Él es un sacerdote católico y un miembro de la Congregación de los Padres y Hermanos del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos). Él está trabajando con el Grupo Internacional Espirítano De Puerto Rico y República Dominicana. Él es el administrador de la Parroquia La Resurrección del Señor, Canóvanas y el Canciller de la Diócesis de Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico. Para más detalles y comentarios se puede contactarlo encanice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, cancilleriadfh@gmail.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com

Hoy, el trigésimo segundo domingo del tiempo ordinario, año A, la Iglesia nos alienta a buscar al Señor y siempre estar dispuesto a acogerlo. Dios mismo es sabiduría. El que lo encuentre y lo reciba, tendrá la plenitud de la vida en Cristo Jesús. Por lo tanto, debemos pedirle a Dios que nos conceda una parte de su sabiduría para saber lo que hacer en todo momento.

En la primera lectura de este domingo, se nos recuerda que “la sabiduría es encontrada por sólo aquellos que la buscan”. Aquí, la sabiduría es personificada como mujer. Por lo tanto, sólo se necesita un “hombre sabio” para salir en busca de ella. El hombre sabio hace esto con paciencia y esperanza, y así, nunca se rinde hasta que ha encontrado la sabiduría. Con sabiduría, somos mejores cristianos y más equipados para enfrentar los desafíos de esta vida.

Por desgracia, descuidamos el hecho de que Dios nos concedió sabiduría para saber cómo buscar y adorarle. Sin sabiduría, nuestra espiritualidad sigue siendo superficial y desequilibrada. Sin sabiduría, nuestra vida religiosa sería mero fanatismo. Sin sabiduría, somos perdedores en todos los aspectos de la vida. Con sabiduría, buscamos, encontramos y adoramos a Dios que es sabiduría. Encontrar la sabiduría es encontrar a Dios.

En la segunda lectura, Pablo alienta a los Tesalonicenses, así como a nosotros, a no molestarse o afligirse demasiado por a los que han muerto antes de la segunda venida de Cristo. Es decir, antes de la parusía. “… No te preocupes por ellos como otras personas que no tienen esperanza … “Dios los traerá con El …”

Esto se basa en la esperanza que tenemos en la resurrección de los muertos. Así que, en lugar de preocuparse tanto por ellos, lo más sensato es preocuparse por nosotros mismos. Lo que debería molestarnos debería ser cuán preparados somos para recibir al Señor. Es importante notar que no hay tiempo especificado para la segunda venida de Cristo. Pablo sólo nos dice que: “lo veremos cuando aparezca en el cielo.” Esto significa que debemos estar preparados en todo momento.

Una vez, escuché a alguien decir a otro: “Espero que tu promesa no sea como la de la parusía de Jesús”. Se rieron sobre ello. Esto es porque, para ellos, la promesa de Cristo está ahora vacía. Han esperado demasiado tiempo. Cristo también ha retrasado demasiado tiempo. Así que, ya no hay necesidad de confiar en El. Sin embargo, sólo los sabios, esperan pacientemente. Ya sea que estemos vivos o muertos, la promesa de Cristo se cumplirá. ¡seguro que vendrá!

En el Evangelio de este domingo, Jesús usó la parábola de las diez vírgenes para enseñarnos cómo debemos estar preparados y alertas para la parusía. Cinco de las vírgenes que esperaban el tren nupcial eran prudentes, mientras que cinco eran tontos. Lo que separa estas dos categorías de vírgenes es la misma delgada línea que separa la sabiduría y la necedad, el cielo y el infierno, o el bien y el mal.

Es el deber del siervo esperar pacientemente a que su amo regrese. Por lo tanto, el momento de la espera no debe ser un momento cansado para nosotros. Más bien, debe ser un momento de gracia para estar bien preparado. No debemos ser víctimas de la undécima hora.

¿Por qué las otras vírgenes no eran caritativas? La respuesta es simple. Eso habría sido lo más estúpido en ese momento. Esto es porque, a la mitad de la fiesta, todo el aceite terminará y todos estarán en tinieblas. En segundo lugar, no hay excusa para que las vírgenes tontas no tengan suficiente aceite en sus lámparas porque tuvieron tiempo de prepararse.

¡Jesús está en camino! Su “demora” no debe ser una excusa para que no estemos listos. Más bien, debería ser una oportunidad para estar preparado y esperar por El. Por lo tanto, nuestra canción cada momento y tiempo debe ser: “Mi alma está sedienta de ti, oh Señor, Dios mío. “¡Mi cuerpo pino para usted como una tierra cansada seco sin agua!”

¡La paz sea con ustedes!

 ¡Maranatha!